Main Street Artists Gallery & Studio - Fine artists working, inspiring and supporting one another
My Blog

A frog house, and frog paintings, serious and whimsical

A frog house, and frog paintings, serious and whimsical
 
Image No. 1 shown here is the final version of a still life that was started in a class. Rochester Art Club show entry rules prohibit class paintings, so I did the scene again (Image No. 2) with the sea and clouds as background. 
A young man in Jamaica who calls me regularly often tends to be sad and frustrated because he is brilliant, has Asperger’s syndrome, and is very much underemployed. I sent him the photo of the second painting and he wrote back “I see serenity, that painting inspires comfort.” 
Of course, I was happy that the painting fulfilled its intention. Still, I wanted to finish the first version. 
The background originally was all black. First I changed this into a stone wall with an arch, then turned that into a Venetian bridge with a canal and boats and the frogs in the dish floating downstream, then tried them in a tornado, and finally, about 11 p.m., I decided to place the face of the painting on my wet palate. The result wasn’t too bad, so I turned it 180 degrees and did it again. With a few more blobs, by 11:30 p.m. it had evolved into Painting No. 1 that you see here and I was done!
There is no end of subjects for an artist to paint. Even limiting oneself to frogs, there are infinite possibilities. My NIA dance teacher and friend Jane Pagano took a photo of frog on her window (Image No. 3), and  I decided to make one realistic (Image No. 4) and one free-association (Image No. 5) painting from her image. Both are 6 x 6 inches.
Somehow, I find it especially fun to paint from photos that friends have taken and given to me. A friend gave me a picture of a green pumpkin frog, and it seemed seasonal to combine that image with our new Pittsford canal-side Frog House for our opening on Oc 21. 
If you missed it, A Frog House (www.facebook.com/A-Frog-House-244426619570950/?ref=br_rsat 65 State Street in Pittsford Village (third house on the left after the bridge walking east on the Towpath from Schoen Place) is open every Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. through Dec. 23. You are invited to visit, where you can donate cash in exchange for my children’s picture book, Froggy Family’s First Frolic, froggy art work, and frogabilia. All donations go toward helping endangered and threatened frogs through education, including designing and publishing my second book, Froggy Family’s Fine Feelings, and visits to school classrooms, scout troops, and other children’s groups.   Or, please help directly with a cash donation to GoFundMe Froggy Family Fabulous Foundation (www.gofundme.com/froggy-family039s-fabulous-foundation?member=935486)where we already have reached 70 percent of our current goal.
~ Margot Fass
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Why I Draw and Paint the Human Figure

Why I draw and paint the human figure
 
When I walked into the studio for my first figure drawing class it was with some apprehension. I knew that drawing from a live model is considered difficult. Well, I wanted to improve, didn’t I?
I had recently begun taking as many classes and workshops as I could and so I had been happy to find that it was like coming home after a great absence and meeting long lost friends.
               I was also a bit concerned that I would feel embarrassed in the presence of the nude model. What if I blushed? What if I revealed my lack of sophistication? I knew I was the product of a conservative upbringing and a society with distorted ideas concerning nudity. I was concerned my drawing skills wouldn’t be up to the task.
]              After a brief demonstration we began with short gesture drawings. Immediately I was completely engrossed in what I was doing.
               Two hours flew by. I continued studying and began attending open studios where I still continue striving to improve. 
               Why does this still hold a fascination for me?
               I had spent 25 years in the fitness industry. I was an athlete for much of my adult life. I had studied anatomy and physiology and what I learned about the human body filled me with wonder. We truly are an amazing creation.
               I have always been fascinated with the kinetic energy of the body. Our bodies are never meant to be completely still, even at rest.
               I wanted to capture this aliveness somehow. It may be why I still love the raw energy of quick poses. Even during longer poses there is never complete stillness. There is a stress and tension that shows in the face and body of the model. How could it be otherwise when my subject is a living, breathing human?
               I have learned that the human form truly is beautiful. This goes beyond mere cliché. 
I logically knew that the airbrushed images held up as an ideal in our society are false, but unfortunately it is the rare person – myself included – who is comfortable in his or her own skin. It is sad that we often see ourselves as not enough when we are so much.
               I have learned this beauty is present in the curve of the neck, the gesture of hand, the tilt of the shoulders, in countless other ways. All I have to do is really look and hopefully see. It has absolutely nothing to do with any false idea of perfection.
               There is so much conveyed not only by the face but the frame. I see pride, power and strength, grace and elegance, gentleness. There is also sadness, weakness and human frailty.
If I am fortunate, sometimes something of the individual and our shared humanity finds its way into my work.
               The psalmist expresses far better than I the most profound reason I am fascinated by the human form;
               Psalm 139:14: “I praise you for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works. My soul knows it very well.”
 : Charcoal : oil : Oil : Charcoal
 : Charcoal
~ Susan Schiffhauer


 

Exploring Caran d'ache

A rapt audience of about 35 interested artists gathered in the Main Street Artists Studio one recent evening to learn about many of the Caran D’Ache art materials. The presentation was given by the company’s national rep, Stefan Lohrer. He was very interesting, informative and entertaining.
            Stefan explained that the company was founded in 1915 in Geneva, Switzerland, where the headquarters and manufacturing facilities remain to this day. Intriguingly, the name Caran D’ache, which was adopted in 1924, traces its origin to the Russian word for pencil – karandash.
Stefan talked about the manufacturing processes, quality control and technical considerations. Then he walked us through an array of products, including Luminance top-of-the-line colored pencils, Pablo colored pencils, Museum Aquarelle high-end water-soluble colored pencils, Supracolor Soft Aquarelle water-soluble colored pencils, traditional graphite drawing pencils and water-soluble graphite pencils, pastel pencils and pastel cubes, Neopastel oil pastel sticks and Neocolor II water-soluble crayons. He also introduced us to the Caran D’Ache Full Blender, a colorless pencil designed to blend, dry mix and intensify the colors of  colored pencils. 
          Stefan gave numerous examples for using the products, including some novel ideas. He certainly sparked the imaginations of the artists.
            At one point Stefan held up a tiny item, an aquarelle travel brush with its own water tank. It filled easily with water and Stefan cleaned it just as easily. It’s a perfect mate with Caran D’Ache water soluble pencils. The brushes come in a package of three different tips: large, medium and fine. I was ready to buy them immediately so I could follow Stefan’s suggestion and travel very lightly for outdoor drawing and painting.
          The audience was very intrigued by the Neocolor ll watersoluble crayons. The luminous colors have an ultra-high concentration of pigment. They can be used for many purposes, including a simple drawing and mono-print process to create self portraits. You can “color” your image directly on a mirror, then press a damp piece of watercolor paper on the mirror, using a roller to transfer the image to the paper. If you hear enthusiastic laughter coming from the MSA studios this fall you will know we are introducing visitors to this process. We’re experimenting and we’ll let you know when we’re ready to go public.
      Everyone who attended the presentation received a goody bag with a generous selection of samples. But if you’d like to check out these fine products, Rochester Art Supply Inc., which sponsored Stefan’s visit, carries a comprehensive collection of the Caran D’ache brand at the venerable store at 150 W. Main St.
 ~ Sue Hegan Henry


Goals Revisited

2018 has been a busy year, so far, for me.
            I started out January with a marketing workshop through my friend Susan Carmen Duffy at Create Art 4 Good. I set goals and went on my merry way. I started painting and attending workshops.
            Then came June and Susan sent me a reminder of my goals in anticipation of our upcoming Marketing Mondaymeeting. I have been attending these meetings regularly in an effort to better promote my art. I was pleasantly surprised that I had accomplished 2½ of my 5 goals. The last two involve doing something I should have done last year. I have a tendency to just paint and ignore the business part of my art. This has caused me to have a surplus of product and no online presence for sales.
            The following are my 2018 goals:
·      Paint more Norris’.
ü  As I mentioned above, I have been painting!
·      Research places to get my art visible outside of Rochester.
ü  I have been looking into shows outside of Rochester and galleries in areas where I like to paint. I’ve entered a couple of competitions and made a painting donation to the Provincetown (MA) Art Association and Museum.
·      Get my website running and consistently posting.
ü  My website is up and running. I’ve been posting regularly on my Facebook page but I have not been writing my blog on my website. I have not added any of my new paintings to my page galleries since November. This goal has only been half reached.
·      Sell online.
·      Get my DBA and tax number.
Now I need to accomplish the last two. I can’t sell online without a tax number and I can’t get a DBA without deciding on the name I want to have…forever.
This is why, while, even though I don’t like to think about the business part of being a creative, I continue to take classes, read articles and attend Marketing Monday meetings. These friends are the ones who keep me honest and gently push me in the direction I need to be headed in.
Along that vein, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that:
·      My Facebook page is Christine D Norris
·      My Instagram page is o2paint 
·      My website is www.christinednorrispaints.com
~ Christine Norris



 

Main Street Artists Biennial Art Exhibition

The 17 members of Rochester’s Main Street Artists group will present its biennial exhibit at Patricia O’Keefe Ross Art Gallery in the Joseph S. Skalny Welcome Center, St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Pittsford. 
            The show runs from June 4 to July 6 with an artists’ reception  6-8 p.m. Friday, June 8. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon Friday. It is free and open to the public.  
            The showwill include more than 50 paintings in a variety of styles and media. Paricipants are Diane Bellenger, Linda Cala, Kathleen Dewitt-Hess, Margot Fass, Sue Hegan Henry, Kathy Lindsley, Jacqueline Lippa, Gabriele Lodder, Daniel Mack Sr., Cris Metcalf, Eleanor Milborrow, Andrea Nadel, Christine D. Norris, Jane Patrick, Susan Schiffhauer, Lisa Zaccour, and Suzi Zefting-Kuhn.
            The Main Street Artists group was founded in January 2010 by Suzi Zefting-Kuhn and now has 17 members who share gallery and work space in the Hungerford Building in downtown Rochester. Studio 458 has become a popular stop during monthly First Friday and Second Saturday events. The St. John Fisher exhibit provides an additional opportunity for people to learn about this dynamic group.
               “Our members enjoy sharing our art with each other and the public,” says Zefting-Kuhn. “Visitors often comment on the creative atmosphere we have all worked so hard to create and, to me, that is the best compliment.”
            For more information, visit www.mainstreetartistsgallery.com or call 585-233-5645.
RSS

Recent Posts

A frog house, and frog paintings, serious and whimsical
Why I Draw and Paint the Human Figure
Exploring Caran d'ache
Goals Revisited
Main Street Artists Biennial Art Exhibition

Categories

Art Tips/Information
Blog
member news
powered by

Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint